Book of the Week: River Under the Road – Scott Spencer

Spencer will likely always be remembered for this 1979 classic, Endless Love. And that’s a shame because good as that book was, Spencer followed that early success with one terrific book after another. Two of his more recent novels remain among my favorites—A Ship Made of Paper and Man in the Woods. To that I happily add this new book.

While the plots of his books are wide-ranging, there is a through-line to his themes. It seems to me that all his books are concerned with how one’s reaction in a moment of strong emotion can tear apart what proves to be the relatively thin scrim of civilization.

Told from alternating points of view over many years, River Under the Road is the story of a marriage—two marriages really–against the backdrop of declining opportunities for the working class and the lottery-like luck that leads a small number of Americans to live lives of luxury while telling themselves they have earned that outsized luck.

The story plays out poignantly on the small canvas of a handful of people’s lives from their early choices to their dawning awareness of their compromises, betrayals and failures. And in a subtle but ultimately devastating way, we see how they stand in for America’s choices over the last fifty years.

What Janet Maslin said of A Ship Made of Paper in the NYT is true for this book, too:

Richly intelligent prose and vivid characters, set against the backdrop of American race relations [in this case substitute “class”]. Here are real people confronting real emotions, whether it’s the electric thrill of illicit love, seething anger over a betrayal or the white-knuckle terror of genuine mortal danger… [the] slowly escalating catastrophe that wrecks buildings and lives – will rattle your bones.”

The best book titles offer and “ah ha” moment and a clue about the writer’s intent. The title for this book comes when two screenwriters are talking at a Hollywood party: “’You want to know what I know, chum?… Eagles can tell how much food is going to be available in their habitat over the next six months and if they see it’s going to be slim pickings they break a couple of their own eggs so there won’t be too many mouths to feed. We’re connected to our environment, too. We’re aware of what’s going on with our species, with our whole world, we can feel it like you can feel a river under a road.’”

Coverage starts with New York Times Book Review and the Washington Post where it was already included as one of most anticipated book of the spring.

“Rich, provocative . . . . Since Endless Love (1979) . . . Spencer’s specialty has been the ache of unrequited (or lost) love. His prose on the subject of romance is fulsome, lush, downright Lawrencian. He has a supple understanding of infidelity and marital dynamics, especially the simmering resentments of a floundering relationship. . . . River Under the Road is wry and insightful.”
— Washington Post

“The story of two couples, recounted across 14 years through the lens of a dozen parties…. At the center of the action are Thaddeus, a screenwriter, and his wife, Grace, an artist who drifts away from her art as the pair moves from bohemia into the bourgeoisie…. Money is an issue throughout the novel—who has it and who doesn’t, what one must do to get it, what happens when it goes away. More to the point, however, this is a book about the vicissitudes of love…”
Kirkus Reviews

River Under the Road (9780062660053) by Scott Spencer. $27.99 hardcover. 6/27/17 on sale.

 

Fiction Short Take: The Destroyers – Christopher Bollen

Bollen follows up Orient, his stylish, well-received novel about murder in a small Long Island town, with a more Hitchcockian exercise in suspense and murder. The NYT writes that The Destroyers is about “beautiful people visiting glamorous places, being wicked enough to bring Patricia Highsmith to mind. It just isn’t summer without this kind of globe-trotting glamour to read about, especially when most of it is set in the Aegean…. Escapism, as calculating as it gets.”

The plot centers around two childhood friends from wealthy families now dealing with complications about their inheritances. Down-on-his-luck Ian is hired to manage his friend Charlie’s yacht. When Charlie goes missing Ian starts looking for him. Suddenly Ian’s eclectic group of acquaintances starts seeming pretty dicey–and the game is afoot.

This one is on tons of summer reading lists including The New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, TIME, Vogue, New York Post and the BBC. Reviews are coming in USA Today, New York Magazine, LA Times and People.

“Bollen manages to create a novel that is equal parts literary and thrilling. His beautiful sentences linger, and each of his characters have rich, complicated pasts that unfold over time… a cinematic and insightful reflection on wealth and the horrendous things it can drive people to do, even to the ones they love.”
Publishers Weekly

 “An eminently worthy heir to Patricia Highsmith. At once gritty, sandy, and silky-good reading for the beach or a yacht, too.”
— Kirkus Reviews

“Atmospheric… a slow-building, literary motorbike ride down steep Greek hillsides…. The writing is sharp, languid, and lovely, and the first-person point of view is a narrowly focused beam that eventually grows to encompass the entirety of the island.”
   — Library Journal

The Destroyers (9780062329981) by Christopher Bollen. $27.99 hardcover. 6/27/17 on sale.

 

July 2017 Indie Next Picks

Complete list here.

  #1     The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. (9780062409164) by Neal Stephenson and Nicole Galland. $35.00 hardcover. 6/13/17 one day laydown.

 

Now in Paperback

Publicity: Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too – by Jomny Sun

This beguiling little book defies easy pigeonholing. Based in Sun’s popular Twitter account, simple line drawings illustrate the adventures of a little alien exploring life on Earth. It’s both more subversive and more touching than you’d think. The Twitter account is hugely popular and fans include Lin-Manuel Miranda, Patton Oswald and Joss Whedon.

There is big profile of Sun this weekend in the New York Times Magazine and he will be interviewed on The PBS NewsHour in coming weeks.

“This is one of those rare treats of a book for me that reminds me how you can be fooled by a book, and in a beautiful way. Remarkably told thru the sparsest of illustrations and text, everyone’s a aliebn when ur a aliebn too has an emotional impact I was not expecting…. a guide to the ups and downs of all human emotion, and it is surprisingly powerful.”
— David Edmonds, customer and fan of Schuler Books & Music, in his blog From My Bookshelf

Everyone’s a Aliebn When Ur a Aliebn Too (9780062569028) by Jomny Sun. $14.99 paper over board.  6/27/17 on sale.

New Fiction: The Force – Don Winslow

We’re always fans of the pithy soundbite in this business and Stephen King’s is memorable: “Think The Godfather, only with cops.”

Winslow already had a career-defining bestseller with his last book, The Cartel, and I think this new one is more than a case of lightning striking twice: I think we’re looking at a writer arriving at full mastery of his craft. The plotting, the finely developed characters, and the moral ambiguity felt on level with the epic TV crime drama, The Wire. Both feel like plot-driven narrative sociologies in steroids. In the case of The Force, to say that the reader comes away with a more nuanced, conflicted sense of good and bad, heroes and villains, is an understatement.

Major media agrees: It’s been covered in a number of summer previews and we already have national review commitments and interviews scheduled in Entertainment Weekly, USA Today, Rolling Stone, the NYTBR, Washington Post, Time and WSJ, with much more to come. It also received two starred advance reviews and is an Indie Next pick.

Janet Maslin weighed in this week in the NYT calling The Force “a shattering New York cop epic about an elite task force leader who’s a hero until he’s not… [A] boisterous, profane book… [that] recalls Sidney Lumet’s great New York police films (Serpico, Prince of the City) and makes their agonies almost quaint by comparison….”

Edgar-finalist Winslow peers into the soul of modern America through the eyes of a supremely skilled and corrupt police officer, in this epic novel of devastating moral complexity. Dennis Malone, a veteran NYPD detective sergeant, leads the Manhattan North Special Task Force, an elite unit established to combat drugs, gangs, and guns. Keeping the citizens safe is often messy work and sometimes requires unorthodox methods to get results. Gradually, however, Malone and his crew have slipped over the edge, stealing millions…. As the reader discovers, Malone’s corruption is but a tiny part of a much larger system that extends into the highest reaches of New York’s power structure, where the real business is done, and everyone on the chain takes a cut. Fans of modern masters such as Don DeLillo, Richard Price, and George Pelecanos will be richly rewarded.”
—  Publishers Weekly (starred, boxed review)

“By turns grim and giddy, this is a good read in the service of dark cops.
—  Kirkus Reviews

“Winslow has created what will likely become our quintessential cop novel, looking both at what cops do right and wrong with clear-eyed realism and passionate humanity.”
Booklist (starred review)

The Force (9780062664419) by Don Winslow. $27.99 hardcover. 6/20/17 one day laydown.

 

More on: The Essex Serpent- Sarah Perry

Holy Moley, it’s hard to imagine a better week opening week of review attention. With stellar Washington Post, WSJ and NYT national reviews and a fascinating NPR interview, this is shaping up to be summer’s literary sleeper hit (though hard to call any book that’s already sold 250,000 copies in England a “sleeper.”)

Don’t skip the video link below to Washington Post reviewer Ron Charles’ “Totally Hip Book Review.” He does these in addition to his reviews in the paper and they are always hilarious. 🙂

“The most delightful heroine since Elizabeth Bennet in Pride and Prejudice… Perry creates that delicate illusion of the best historical fiction: an authentic sense of the past — its manners, ideals and speech — that feels simultaneously distant and relevant to us…By the end, The Essex Serpent identifies a mystery far greater than some creature ‘from the illuminated margins of a manuscript’: friendship.”
Washington Post (full review)

[A] novel of almost insolent ambition — lush and fantastical, a wild Eden behind a garden gate. Set in the Victorian era, it’s part ghost story and part natural history lesson, part romance and part feminist parable. It’s wonderfully dense and serenely self-assured. I found it so transporting that 48 hours after completing it, I was still resentful to be back home… Perry’s writing engages the senses. You can almost smell the brine, the oyster, the ‘secretive scent of fungus clinging to the oak.’ But the real abundance here is of feelings between characters, not all of them sentimental. It’s been a while since I’ve read a book in which a man and a woman quarrel quite so much, and quite so forcefully, without something devastating coming of it.”
New York Times (full review)

“Richly enjoyable… Ms. Perry writes beautifully and sometimes agreeably sharply… The Essex Serpent is a wonderfully satisfying novel. Ford Madox Ford thought the glory of the novel was its ability to make the reader think and feel at the same time. This one does just that.”
Wall Street Journal (full review)

The Essex Serpent (9780062666376) by Sarah Perry. $26.99 hardcover. 6/6/17 on sale.

 

Now in Paperback: News of the World – Paulette Jiles

This New York Times bestseller, National Book Award Finalist and MPIBA “Reading the West” award winner was also on many “Best of the Year” round-ups at the end of 2016. So, it should be a crowd-pleaser on the paperback tables all summer long.

The new edition also includes a P.S. section with an essay from Jiles and reading group guide. And I just heard it’s in development as a movie starring Tom Hanks. (Perfect casting!)

News of the World (9780062409218) by Paulette Jiles. $15.99 trade paper. 6/20/17 on sale.